Copyrights

Whether you are a photographer, musician, web developer, or other artist and/or creator, a registered copyright is a significant tool that can help protect your work.   A copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (Title 17 of the U.S. Code) to the authors as it relates to their “original works of authorship.”  This may include literary works (such as books or novels), dramatic works (such as plays), musical works (such as songs), artistic works (such as paintings), and certain other intellectual works.  You have copyright protection regardless of whether the work is published or unpublished.

Specifically, section 102 of the Copyright Act  provides as follows:

(a) Copyright protection subsists, in accordance with this title, in original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. Works of authorship include the following categories:

(1) literary works;

(2) musical works, including any accompanying words;

(3) dramatic works, including any accompanying music;

(4) pantomimes and choreographic works;

(5) pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works;

(6) motion pictures and other audiovisual works;

(7) sound recordings; and

(8) architectural works.

(b) In no case does copyright protection for an original work of authorship extend to any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery, regardless of the form in which it is described, explained, illustrated, or embodied in such work.

When a work is registered, a copyright owner is given the exclusive right to do and to authorize others to do the following:

  1. Reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords
  2. Distribute copies or phonorecords of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending
  3. Display the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work
  4. Prepare derivative works based upon the work
  5. Perform the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual
    works
  6. Perform the work publicly (in the case of sound recordings) by means of a digital audio transmission

 

Filing a Copyright Made Easy

Provide us basic information about you and your work

We will prepare your Copyright application

An attorney on our Team will review your application and it will be fielded at the U.S. Copyright Office

(Wherein you will receive a certificate of Registration within 6-10 months)

That's It!